Planned Parenthood’s Founder, The Eugenicist Margaret Sanger

Edward WhiteEDWARD WHITE, ACLJ

Most right-minded people look at children as gifts from God. Not Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood. She did not like children.

In her book, Women and the New Race, Sanger expressed her disgust toward large families, rich and poor, viewing them as harmful to society: “The immorality of large families lies not only in their injury to the members of those families but in their injury to society. . . . The most merciful thing that the large family does to one of its infant members is to kill it.”

Sanger was a life-long, unapologetic eugenicist. She believed that society could—and should—create a superior race of people free from those whom she deemed the “unfit,” which would lead to world peace.

As part of her overall plan to achieve world peace, she wanted Congress to appoint a Parliament of Population Directors. One objective of that group would be to “apply a stern and rigid policy of sterilization, and segregation to that grade of population whose progeny is already tainted or whose inheritance is such that objectionable traits may be transmitted to offspring.”

Once the “unfit” were sterilized or segregated, there would be a “definite inexorable ruling that the population [of the “fit”] should increase slowly at a specified rate,” and America would then “organize and join an International League of Low Birth Rate Nations to secure and maintain WORLD PEACE.”

Sanger’s eugenic ideology led her to found Planned Parenthood, this country’s largest abortion provider, which continues to give out the Margaret Sanger Award each year as its “highest honor.”

Sanger’s evil worldview was the vision of a person who did not value all human life equally and who thought she was qualified to determine who lives, who dies, and who never gets to be born to bring about her version of a utopian society. She is not a person who should be honored.


Edward White is Senior Counsel with the ACLJ and has been practicing law for more than twenty years. He is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame Law School, where he was a Thomas J. White Center for Law & Government Scholar and managing and student articles editor of the Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics & Public Policy.


Used with the permission of the American Center for Law and Justice.