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American Minute

Bill Federer serves up a daily dose of inspiration from the pages of American history with a special emphasis on America's Judeo-Christian heritage.

American Minute with Bill Federer Gold had been discovered in Georgia in 1828, resulting in a Democrat-controlled Congress rushing through the Indian Removal Act, which passed by a single vote in 1830. It was signed by Democrat President Andrew Jackson and carried out by Democrat President Martin Van Buren. Though unauthorized by...
American Minute with Bill Federer "Mark Twain," a river measurement meaning 12-feet-deep, was the pen name of Samuel Langhorne Clemens. Growing up on the Mississippi, Clemens left school at age 12 when his father died. He became a printer's apprentice, then piloted steamboats till the War between the States suspended river traffic. Samuel...
American Minute with Bill Federer Born in Haddam, Connecticut, APRIL 20, 1718, his parents died while he was a young teenager. He attempted farming, but on July 12, 1739, he had an experience with God of 'unspeakable glory' that gave him a "hearty desire to exalt Him, to set Him on...
American Minute with Bill Federer The sun never set on the British Empire. It was the largest empire in world history. Out of nearly 200 countries in the world, only 22 were never controlled or invaded by Britain. In April of 1775, the British Royal Military Governor of Massachusetts, General Thomas Gage,...
American Minute with Bill Federer William Brewster is portrayed in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda holding an open Bible, in the painting "Embarkation of the Pilgrims." William Brewster is also portrayed in the Rotunda giving thanks to God in the "Frieze of American History" depiction of "The Landing of the Pilgrims." William Brewster...
American Minute with Bill Federer On APRIL 17, 1790, the son of a poor candle-maker died. The 15th of 17 children, he apprenticed as a printer and published a popular almanac. He retired at age 42, then taught himself five languages, invented the rocking chair, a stove, bifocal glasses, and the lighting...
American Minute with Bill Federer Henry Opukahai'a was an orphan raised by his uncle to be a pagan priest but he became disillusioned with rituals and chants. He fled Hawaii in 1807 with his friend Thomas Hopu on the American whaling ship Triumph bound for New England. They were befriended by Christian...
American Minute with Bill Federer On APRIL 15, 1865, President Lincoln died. He was shot the night before in Ford's Theater. On APRIL 15, 1912, the Titanic sank. It struck an iceberg the night before. Among the 1,514 lives lost were millionaires John Jacob Astor IV, Benjamin Guggenheim and Isa Strauss, all of whom...
American Minute with Bill Federer Noah Webster first published his American Dictionary of the English Language on APRIL 14, 1828. In order to evaluate the etymology of words, he learned 26 languages, including Old English, German, Greek, Latin, Italian, Spanish, French, Hebrew, Arabic, and Sanskrit. Taking over two decades to complete, Webster's...
American Minute with Bill Federer Thomas Jefferson was born APRIL 13, 1743. He drafted the Declaration of Independence, 1776; was Governor of Virginia, 1779-1781; and founded the University of Virginia in 1819. While U.S. Minister to France, 1785-1789, Jefferson met with the Muslim Ambassador from Tripoli to negotiate freeing hundreds of captured...
American Minute with Bill Federer Prior to the Civil War, tariffs on imports into southern ports, notably Charleston, South Carolina, provided the majority of the revenue for the U.S. Federal Government. A Federal income tax did not exist yet. Tariff taxes on foreign made goods made them more expensive, causing people to...
American Minute with Bill Federer "Houston, we've had a problem" were the words sent from Apollo 13, which was launched for the moon APRIL 11, 1970. Mission control identified that an oxygen tank had exploded, irreparably damaging the craft. Thousands prayed in New York City's Times Square, at Chicago's Board of Trade,...
American Minute with Bill Federer Millions of people in 118 countries are helped by The Salvation Army, founded by William Booth, who was born APRIL 10, 1829. At the age of 13, Booth was sent to apprentice as a pawnbroker. His job made him aware of poverty, and the humiliation and degradation...
American Minute with Bill Federer Wilmer McLean's farm in Manassas Junction, Virginia, was the location of the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861. Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard, who was using McLean's house as his headquarters, wrote: "... of this artillery fight was the destruction of the dinner of myself and staff...
American Minute with Bill Federer Five-Star General Omar Bradley died APRIL 8, 1981. In August 1944, General Omar Bradley led the 12th Army Group in France and Germany, consisting of a million men in four armies. President Johnson addressed him, May 23, 1964: "General Bradley, you were the field commander of more American...
American Minute with Bill Federer "The Greatest Show on Earth" was owned by P.T. Barnum, who died APRIL 7, 1891. Selling millions of tickets, the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus had big draws including General Tom Thumb, a man only 25 inches tall, and elephant "Jumbo," whose name entered...
American Minute with Bill Federer "The Great War" began in 1914 between Germany and its allies, and England and France and their allies. Battles were fought in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, the Pacific Islands, China and off the coast of South and North America. One of the reasons for World War...
American Minute with Bill Federer John Adams wrote to his cousin, Rev. Zabdiel Adams, June 21, 1776: "Statesmen, my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for liberty, bu t it is religion and morality alone, which can establish the principles upon which freedom can securely stand. The only foundation of a free...
American Minute with Bill Federer Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated APRIL 4, 1968. Pastor of Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church, he rose to national prominence through the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1964/ Republican President Ronald Reagan signed a bill on November...
American Minute with Bill Federer The world of communication was revolutionized by a man who died APRIL 2, 1872. His name was Samuel F.B. Morse, inventor of the Telegraph and the Morse Code. Samuel F.B. Morse graduated from Yale in 1810, and became one of the greatest portrait artists. He founded the National...