DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, C.S. LEWIS “If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark...
DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, JOHN CALVIN Do not abate your speed, because you approach the goal, ... By too much delay the harvest-time will pass by, and the cold of a perpetual winter set in. The more age weighs on you, the more swiftly ought you to press on,...
Here I stand; I can do no otherwise. God help me. Amen! Martin Luther
Daily Dabble in the Classics, F.A. Hayek Liberty not only means that the individual has both the opportunity and the burden of choice; it also means that he must bear the consequences of his actions and will receive praise or blame for them. Liberty and responsibility are inseparable. A free...
A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens Stave 2 - The First of the Three Spirits When Scrooge awoke, it was so dark, that looking out of bed, he could scarcely distinguish the transparent window from the opaque walls of his chamber. He was endeavouring to pierce the darkness with his ferret...
A  Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens Stave 1 - Marley's Ghost Marley was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it. And Scrooge's name was good upon...
AMERICANIST: INSPIRATIONAL POETRY He drew a circle that shut me out. Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout. But Love and I had the wit to win: We drew a circle that took him in! By Edwin Markham (Photo Credit: Press photograph from the George Grantham Bain collection, donated to the Library of Congress in 1948....
FREE ENTERPRISE ZONE: FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES 1776 The natural effort of every individual to better his own condition, when suffered to exert itself with freedom and security is so powerful a principle that it is alone, and without any assistance, not only capable of carrying on the society to wealth and prosperity,...
JONATHAN DOLHENTY, PH.D. Logical Universals: Predicables The logical universal expresses the nature common to many, precisely as it is applicable to many. Our intellect considers the extension of the universal and reflects on the contents of an idea to see how it applies to its subjects precisely as a universal, that...
by Mortimer J. Adler, Ph.D. Who has not said or heard someone else say "Enough is enough"? The statement is a tautology and, as such, uninstructive. But everyone knows what that idiomatic statement means: "That's enough, I don't want any more." All of us have heard people say "That's not enough,...
RYAN T. ANDERSON, PH.D., HERITAGE FOUNDATION The Hippocratic Oath proclaims: “I will keep from harm and injustice. I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect.” This is an essential precept for a flourishing civil society....
JONATHAN DOLHENTY, PH.D. It is an undisputed fact of history that the gems of the American Declaration of Independence are contained in the writings of British philosopher John Locke, specifically the second of his Two Treatises on Government. This tract was published in 1690 in order to justify the British...
DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW The Courtship of Miles Standish I. Miles Standish IN the Old Colony days, in Plymouth the land of the Pilgrims, To and fro in a room of his simple and primitive dwelling, Clad in doublet and hose, and boots of Cordovan leather, Strode, with a martial...
DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, ST. THOMAS AQUINAS In order for a war to be just, three things are necessary. First, the authority of the sovereign…. Secondly, a just cause…. Thirdly … a rightful intention. Source: ST. THOMAS AQUINAS, Summa Theologica, part II–II, question 40, article 1, pp. 1359–60 (1947 edition)....
DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, PLATO Tyranny naturally arises out of democracy, and the most aggravated form of tyranny and slavery out of the most extreme form of liberty . . . . The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness . ....
DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, WILLIAM WORDSWORTH Intimations of Immortality Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting: The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar: Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is...
DAILY DABBLE IN THE CLASSICS, CICERO In the last years of the Roman Republic, Marcus Tullius Cicero, penned his dialogue De Legibus (On the Laws). Regarding the Nature of Man, of Justice, of Right, of True Law and of the Framer and Proposer of this Law, Cicero testified: Of all these...
Daily Dabble in the Classics, Frédéric Bastiat It is not true that the legislator has absolute power over our persons and property. The existence of persons and property preceded the existence of the legislator, and his function is only to guarantee their safety. It is not true that the function of...
American Thought Emerson’s essay on “Farming”—first published in Society and Solitude—was initially an oration given to the Middlesex Agricultural Society during the Cattle-Show on September 29, 1858. He originally called the address “The Man with the Hoe.” “Not so, Mr. Malthus, but just the opposite of so is the fact.” Farming. ————— Mr. President,...
DABBLING IN THE CLASSICS, ARISTOTLE Therefore he who bids the law rule may be deemed to bid God and Reason alone rule, but he who bids man rule adds an element of the beast; for desire is a wild beast, and passion perverts the minds of rulers, even when they...