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Commentaries on the Laws of England by William Blackstone Introduction

COMMENTARIES ON THE LAWS OF ENGLAND (1765 - 1769) Volume 1, Chapter 11 THE people, whether aliens, denizens, or natural-born subjects, are divisible into two kinds; the clergy and laity: the clergy, comprehending all persons in holy orders, and in ecclesiastical offices, will be the subject of the following chapter. THIS venerable...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Book 1, Chapter 10 1765-1769 HAVING, in the eight preceding chapters, treated of persons as they stand in the public relations of magistrates, I now proceed to consider such persons as fall under the denomination of...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Book 1, Chapter 9 1765-1769 IN a former chapter of these commentaries1 we distinguished magistrates into two kinds; supreme, or those in whom the sovereign power of the state resides; and subordinate, or those who act...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Book 1, Chapter 8 1765-1769 HAVING, in the preceding chapter, considered at large those branches of the king’s prerogative, which contribute to his royal dignity, and constitute the executive power of the government, we proceed...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Book 1, Chapter 7 1765-1769 IT was observed in a former chapter,1 that one of the principal bulwarks of civil liberty, or (in other words) of the British constitution, was the limitation of the king’s...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Chapter 6. 1765-1769 I PROCEED next to the duties, incumbent on the king by our constitution; in consideration of which duties his dignity and prerogative are established by the laws of the land: it...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Book 1, Chapter 4 1765-1769 THE first and most considerable branch of the king’s royal family, regarded by the laws of England, is the queen. THE queen of England is either queen regent, queen...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Introduction, Section 3 1765-1769 THE supreme executive power of these kingdoms is vested by our laws in a single person, the king or queen: for it matters not to which sex the crown...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England , Book 1 (Rights of Persons) CHAPTER 2—OF THE PARLIAMENT  WE are next to treat of the rights and duties of persons, as they are members of society, and stand in various relations to each other. These relations are either...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England - Book 1: Rights of Persons, Chapter 1 1765-1769 The objects of the laws of England are so very numerous and extensive, that, in order to consider them with any tolerable ease and perspicuity, it will be necessary to distribute...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Introduction, Section 4 1765-1769 The kingdom of England, over which our municipal laws have jurisdiction, includes not, by the common law, either Wales, Scotland, or Ireland, or any other part of the king's dominions, except the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Introduction, Section 3 1765-1769 The municipal law of England, or the rule of civil conduct prescribed to the inhabitants of this kingdom, may with sufficient propriety be divided into two kinds; the lex non scripta, the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS (1765-1769) Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4), Introduction, Section 2 Law, in its most general and comprehensive sense, signifies a rule of action; and is applied indiscriminately to all kinds of action, whether animate or inanimate, rational or irrational. Thus we...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Commentaries on the Laws of England (Vol. 1 of 4): Introduction, Section 1 Lecture delivered at Oxford at the opening of the Vinerian lectures, 25 October 1758 Mr. Vice-Chancellor, And Gentlemen Of The University, The general expectation of so numerous and respectable an audience, the novelty, and...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS (1765-1769) Based on the first edition, together with the most material corrections and additions in the second edition. Translation of greek, latin, italian and french quotations (with some modifications) by J. W. Jones, Esq. (1823). Footnotes have been converted to chapter end notes. Spelling has...