AMERICANIST HISTORY Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville Volume 1, Chapter 2, Published 1831 UTILITY of knowing the origin of nations, in order to understand their social condition and their laws--America the only country in which the starting-point of a great people has been clearly observable--In what respects all who emigrated to...
AMERICANIST HISTORY Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville Volume 1, Chapter 1, Published 1831 North America is divided into two vast regions, one inclining towards the Pole, the other towards the Equator--Valley of the Mississippi--Traces found there of the revolutions of the globe --Shore of the Atlantic Ocean, on which the English...
AMERICANIST HISTORY & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Volume 1, AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION AMONG the novel objects that attracted my attention during my stay in the United States, nothing struck me more forcibly than the general equality of condition among the people. I readily discovered the prodigious influence that...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix BB: The Dangers of Apathy Leading to either Anarchy or Tyranny It cannot be absolutely or generally affirmed that the greatest danger of the present age is license or tyranny, anarchy or despotism. Both are equally to be feared; and the one may...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix AA: Of the nature of military governments among democratic ideas I have often asked myself what would happen if, amid the laxity of democratic customs, and as a consequence of the restless spirit of the army, a military government were ever to be established...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix Z: The Dangers of Democracy Leading to a Centralized Government Not only is a democratic people led by its own taste to centralize its government, but the passions of all the men by whom it is governed constantly urge it in the same...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix Y: Of Men's Means and Ends vs. That of God's Men place the greatness of their idea of unity in the means, God in the ends; hence this idea of greatness, as men conceive it, leads us to infinite littleness. To compel all...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix X: Physical Gratification and a Taste for Well-Being leading to an Army Afraid of War.  In the chapter to which this note relates I have pointed out one source of danger; I am now about to point out another, more rare indeed, but...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix W Aside from all those who do not think at all and those who dare not say what they think, the immense majority of Americans will still be found to appear satisfied with their political institutions; and I believe they really are so....
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix V It is not the equality of condition that makes men immoral and irreligious; but when men, being equal, are also immoral and irreligious, the effects of immorality and irreligion more easily manifest themselves, because men have but little influence over each other,...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix U I find in my traveling-journal a passage that may serve to convey a more complete notion of the trials to which the women of America, who consent to follow their husbands into the wilds, are often subjected. This description has nothing to...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix T Some aristocracies, however, have devoted themselves eagerly to commerce and have cultivated manufactures with success. The history of the world furnishes several conspicuous examples. But, generally speaking, the aristocratic principle is not favorable to the growth of trade and manufactures. Moneyed aristocracies...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix S If we attentively examine the constitution of the jury in civil proceedings in England, we shall readily perceive that the jurors are under the immediate control of the judge. It is true that the verdict of the jury, in civil as well...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix R The Federal Constitution has introduced the jury into the tribunals of the Union, just as the states had introduced it into their own several courts; but as it has not established any fixed rules for the choice of jurors, the Federal courts...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix Q To be a voter in the county (those who represent landed property) before the Reform Bill passed in 1832, it was necessary to have unencumbered, in one's own ownership or on lease for life land bringing in at least 40 shillings' income....
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix P The first American newspaper appeared in April 1704, and was published at Boston. (See Collections of the Historical Society of Massachusetts, Vol. VI, p. 66.) It would be a mistake to suppose that the press has always been entirely free in the...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix O It is true that the powers of Europe may carry on maritime wars against the Union; but it is always easier and less dangerous to undertake a maritime than a continental war. Maritime . warfare requires only one species of effort. A...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix N There is no question on which the American Constitutions agree more fully than on that of political jurisdiction. All the Constitutions which take cognizance of this matter give to the House of Representatives the exclusive right of impeachment; excepting only the Constitution...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix M The most esteemed authors who have written upon the English Constitution agree with each other in establishing the omnipotence of Parliament. Delolme says (Chap. X, p. 77): "It is a fundamental principle with the English lawyers, that Parliament can do everything except make...
Democracy In America, Alexis de Tocqueville, 1831 Appendix L This immutability of the Constitution in France is a necessary consequence of the laws. To begin with the most important of all the laws, that which decides the order of succession to the throne, what can be more immutable in its principle...