FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS To the People of the State of New York—October 27, 1787 Introduction AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance;...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, August 13, Saturday, August 16, 1788 Brief Summary of Arguments For and Against the Proposed Constitution with a focus on whether it is best to propose Amendments Before or After Ratification. ACCORDING to the formal division of the subject of these papers, announced in my first...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, July 16, Saturday, July 26, Saturday, August 9, 1788 Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered to including a fascinating discussion on a proposed Bill of Rights. IN THE course of the foregoing review of the Constitution, I have taken notice of, and...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, July 5, Wednesday, July 9, Saturday July 12, 1788 Judiciary in relation to trial by jury, interpreting written law of Constitutions as to enumerated rights v. non-enumerated, implied v. clearly stated, etc. THE objection to the plan of the convention, which has met with most success...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, July 2, 1788 The Judiciary Continued THE erection of a new government, whatever care or wisdom may distinguish the work, cannot fail to originate questions of intricacy and nicety; and these may, in a particular manner, be expected to flow from the establishment of a constitution...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, June 25, and Saturday, June 28, 1788 Judiciary Continued and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority LET US now return to the partition of the judiciary authority between different courts, and their relations to each other. "The judicial power of the United States is" (by the plan...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, June 21, 1788 Judicial Powers and Jurisdiction TO JUDGE with accuracy of the proper extent of the federal judicature, it will be necessary to consider, in the first place, what are its proper objects. It seems scarcely to admit of controversy, that the judicary authority of the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS The Judiciary Continued NEXT to permanency in office, nothing can contribute more to the independence of the judges than a fixed provision for their support. The remark made in relation to the President is equally applicable here. In the general course of human nature, a power...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, October 27, 1787 General Introduction AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance; comprehending in its consequences nothing less than...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS June 14, 1788 The Judiciary Department WE PROCEED now to an examination of the judiciary department of the proposed government. In unfolding the defects of the existing Confederation, the utility and necessity of a federal judicature have been clearly pointed out. It is the less necessary to recapitulate the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS April 2, 1788 The Appointing Power Continued, Other Executive Powers Considered IT HAS been mentioned as one of the advantages to be expected from the co-operation of the Senate, in the business of appointments, that it would contribute to the stability of the administration. The consent of...
FOUNDERS CORNER, MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, April 1, 1788 President's Appointment Power with Advice and Consent of Senate THE President is "to nominate, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, March 26, 1788 Treaty Making Power of the Executive (President) THE President is to have power, "by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two thirds of the senators present concur." Though this provision has been assailed, on different grounds,...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, March 25, 1788 Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and Pardoning Power of the President THE President of the United States is to be "commander-in-chief of the army and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several States when called into...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Friday, March 21, 1788 The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power THE third ingredient towards constituting the vigor of the executive authority, is an adequate provision for its support. It is evident that, without proper attention to this article, the separation of...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, March 19, 1788 President's Duration In Office (Cont.), and Re-Eligibility Considered THE administration of government, in its largest sense, comprehends all the operations of the body politic, whether legislative, executive, or judiciary; but in its most usual, and perhaps its most precise signification. it is limited to executive...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, March 18, 1788 Executive (Presidential) Term Length, Independence from the Legislature, Firmness DURATION in office has been mentioned as the second requisite to the energy of the Executive authority. This has relation to two objects: to the personal firmness of the executive magistrate, in the employment...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Saturday, March 15, 1788 The Executive Department Further Considered THERE is an idea, which is not without its advocates, that a vigorous Executive is inconsistent with the genius of republican government. The enlightened well-wishers to this species of government must at least hope that the supposition is...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS March 14, 1788 The Real Characters of the Chief Executive I PROCEED now to trace the real characters of the proposed Executive, as they are marked out in the plan of the convention. This will serve to place in a strong light the unfairness of the representations which...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, March 12, 1788 The Electoral College: A unique, wise, safe, and superior system for electing the President of the United States THE mode of appointment of the Chief Magistrate of the United States is almost the only part of the system, of any consequence, which has...