FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, March 1, 1788 The United States Senate (continued) A fifth desideratum, illustrating the utility of a senate, is the want of a due sense of national character. Without a select and stable member of the government, the esteem of foreign powers will not only be forfeited by...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, February 27, 1788 The United States Senate HAVING examined the constitution of the House of Representatives, and answered such of the objections against it as seemed to merit notice, I enter next on the examination of the Senate. The heads into which this member of the government...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, February 20, 1788 Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered THE remaining charge against the House of Representatives, which I am to examine, is grounded on a supposition that the number of members will not be...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, February 19, 1788 The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation THE third charge against the House of Representatives is, that it will be taken from that class of citizens which will...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Saturday, February 16, 1788 The total number of members of the House of Representatives (continued) THE second charge against the House of Representatives is, that it will be too small to possess a due knowledge of the interests of its constituents. As this objection evidently proceeds from a...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, February 13, 1788  As to the total members of the House of Representatives. Is the initial small number of Representatives - 65 (to be augmented regularly) - a threat to liberty, or would too high a number be the greater threat? THE number of which the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, February 12, 1788 Madison addresses the delicate balance achieved in deciding the number of representatives from each state in the U.S. House, particularly in relationship to the institution of slavery, but also in regards to taxation, property, and political influence in general. THE next view which...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, February 9, 1788 U.S. House of Representatives (Biennial v. Annual Elections, As Well as Knowledge Required for the Office, Considered) I SHALL here, perhaps, be reminded of a current observation, "that where annual elections end, tyranny begins." If it be true, as has often been remarked,...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Friday, February 8, 1788 House of Representatives Considered in Light of Republican Principles of Government, Especially Grant of Power Versus Term of Office. Historical Examples Given. FROM the more general inquiries pursued in the four last papers, I pass on to a more particular examination of the...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, February 6, 1788 The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments TO WHAT expedient, then, shall we finally resort, for maintaining in practice the necessary partition of power among the several departments, as laid down in the Constitution?...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS February 5, 1788 Periodical Appeals to the People Considered IT MAY be contended, perhaps, that instead of occasional appeals to the people, which are liable to the objections urged against them, periodical appeals are the proper and adequate means of preventing and correcting infractions of the Constitution. It will...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, February 2, 1788 Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention THE author of the Notes on the State of Virginia, quoted in the last paper, has subjoined to that valuable work the draught of...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Friday, February 1, 1788 These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other IT WAS shown in the last paper that the political apothegm there examined does not require that the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments should be wholly...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, January 30, 1788 The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts HAVING reviewed the general form of the proposed government and the general mass of power allotted to it, I proceed to examine the particular structure of this...
FOUNDERS CORNER MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, January 29, 1788 The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared RESUMING the subject of the last paper, I proceed to inquire whether the federal government or the State governments will have the advantage with regard to the predilection and support of the people. Notwithstanding the...
FOUNDERS CORNER: MAJOR WORKS Saturday, January 26, 1788 Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered HAVING shown that no one of the powers transferred to the federal government is unnecessary or improper, the next question to be considered is, whether the whole mass of them will...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Friday, January 25, 1788 Restrictions on the Powers of the States A fifth class of provisions in favor of the federal authority consists of the following restrictions on the authority of the several States: "No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of...
FOUNDERS CORNER MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, January 23, 1788 Miscellaneous Powers Conferred by the Constitution Considered THE fourth class comprises the following miscellaneous powers: A power "to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing, for a limited time, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." The...
FOUNDERS CORNER, MAJOR WORKS Saturday, January 19, 1788 The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered THE Constitution proposed by the convention may be considered under two general points of view. The FIRST relates to the sum or quantity of power which it vests in the government, including the restraints imposed on...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Tuesday, January 22, 1788 General view of the powers conferred by the proposed Constitution THE second class of powers, lodged in the general government, consists of those which regulate the intercourse with foreign nations, to wit: to make treaties; to send and receive ambassadors, other public ministers,...