CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, AMERICAN FOUNDING ERA, REV. DANIEL SHUTE Reverend Daniel Shute defends the proposed U.S. Constitution and specifically its prohibition of religious tests—Massachusetts Ratification Debates, 31 January 1788 Rev. Mr Shute: Mr. President—To object to the latter part of the paragraph under consideration, which excludes a religious test, is, I...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, REV. TIMOTHY STONE ELECTION SERMON, MAY 10TH, 1792 A SERMON, PREACHED BEFORE HIS EXCELLENCY SAMUEL HUNTINGTON, ESQ. L.L.D. GOVERNOR, AND THE HONORABLE THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, CONVENED AT HARTFORD, ON THE DAY OF THE ANNIVERSARY ELECTION. BY TIMOTHY STONE, A. M. PASTOR OF A...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS: JOHN LELAND 1791 Divines generally inform us that there is such a time to come (called the Latter-Day Glory) when the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth as the waters do the sea, and that this day will appear upon the destruction of...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, JOHN WOOLMAN From an inward purifying, and steadfast abiding under it springs a lively operative desire for the good of others. All the faithful are not called to the public ministry; but whoever are, are called to minister of that which they have tasted and handled spiritually....
Background of the American Revolution Following the Boston Tea Party, Dr. Jonathan Shipley—Bishop of St. Asaph—writes a speech intended for the debate in the House of Lords over altering the charter for Massachusetts. Subsequently published, Benjamin Franklin—his good friend—deems it “a masterpiece of eloquence.” Let us be content with the spoils...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA, THOMAS JEFFERSON 15 August 1779 The reverend Charles Clay has been many years rector of this parish, and has been particularly known to me. During the whole course of that time his deportment has been exemplary as became a divine, and his attention to parochial duties...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS Elisha Williams, 1744 I shall first, briefly consider the Origin and End of Civil Government. First, as to the origin—–Reason teaches us that all men are naturally equal in respect of jurisdiction or dominion one over another. Altho’ true it is that children are not...
Called Unto Liberty, Founding Era Sermons, Charles Chauncy Charles Chauncy (1705–1787). The most influential clergyman in the Boston of his time and—apart from Jonathan Edwards the elder—in all New England, Chauncy was graduated from Harvard and served as pastor of the First Church in Boston for sixty years. A thoroughly...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS, STANLEY GRISWOLD, 1801 A Yale graduate in 1786 and Congregational clergyman at New Milford, Connecticut, Griswold led a checkered life and died of a fever at Shawneetown, Illinois Territory. He was expelled from the pulpit in 1797, allegedly because of his disbelief in human...
Commentary In 1710, Jonathan Swift writes an essay for The Examiner. Besides, as the vilest writer has his readers, so the greatest liar has his believers; and it often happens, that if a lie be believed only for an hour, it has done its work, and there is no farther occasion...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS A SERMON Preach'd before His EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOUR The HONOURABLE COUNCIL AND Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England, on a Day of FASTING and PRAYER in the Council Chamber, Dec. 3. 1740. By Joseph Sewall, D.D. Pastor of a Church of CHRIST...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS A SERMON Preach'd before His EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOUR The HONOURABLE COUNCIL AND Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England, on a Day of FASTING and PRAYER in the Council Chamber, Dec. 3. 1740. By Joseph Sewall, D.D. Pastor of a Church of CHRIST...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS, ABRAHAM WILLIAMS Boston 1762 Independent and audacious enough while a student at Harvard to be known in some ministerial groups as “the Grand Heretick Williams,” Abraham chose to pursue a course of caution and reasonableness after his selection for a Congregationalist pulpit in Sandwich,...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS BOSTON, 1741 Born in Hatfield, Massachusetts on April 22, 1688, Jonathan Dickinson studied theology at the Collegiate School of Connecticut (which later was later renamed Yale College), graduating in 1706. In 1709 Dickinson was ordained minister of the first Presbyterian church in Elizabethtown, New Jersey....
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS, MOSES MATHER 1775 Free agency, or a rational existence, with its powers and faculties, and freedom of enjoying and exercising them, is the gift of God to man. The right of the donor, and the authenticity of the donation, are both incontestable; hence man hath...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS APRIL 1778 ... That there is a God, “is the prime foundation of all religion.” We should therefore employ our utmost diligence to establish our minds in the stedfast belief of it. For when once we have firmly settled in our minds the belief of...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS: JOHN WITHERSPOON 1776 The wrath of man praiseth God, as it is the instrument in his hand for bringing sinners to repentance, and for the correction and improvement of his own children. Whatever be the nature of the affliction with which he visits either persons,...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, ISAAC BACKUS 1773 In civil states the power of the whole collective body is vested in a few hands, that they may with better advantage defend themselves against injuries from abroad, and correct abuses at home, for which end a few have a right to judge for the...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS July 20, 1775 Preached in Christ-Church, Philadelphia, before the Honourable Continental Congress, July 20, 1775. Being the Day Recommended by Them for a General Fast throughout the United English Colonies of America. THE AMERICAN VINE: A SERMON Psalm 80, Verse 14 Return, We Beseech Thee, O God of...
CALLED UNTO LIBERTY, FOUNDING ERA SERMONS: JOHN TUCKER Boston 1771 Editor's Note English colonists in America began living under local government based upon the consent of the majority before John Locke was born, and by the time he wrote his Second Treatise they had evolved most of the institutions and practices that...