by Mortimer J. Adler, Ph.D. The word "law" in the vocabulary of religious Jews, Christians, and Muslims means the divinely ordained law of the Ten Commandants, and the Mosaic law enunciated in the last three books of the Pentateuch. In the first two of these three religions, the ten Commandments are...
From Firing Line, philosopher Mortimer Adler discusses the pursuit of knowledge with William F. Buckley Jr. http://www.LibertyPen.com
Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr.: The Idea of The Great Ideas Episode 193, Recorded on March 13, 1970 Guest: Mortimer Jerome Adler
by Mortimer J. Adler, Ph.D. With respect to philosophy, the following propositions must be affirmed. He who denies any one of them denies philosophy. I) Philosophy is public knowledge, not private opinion, in the same sense that science is knowledge, not opinion. 2) Philosophical knowledge answers questions which science cannot answer, now...
BY MORTIMER J. ADLER, PH.D . Though the considerations with which l begin may appear abstract and theoretical, I think you will see that the analysis I am going to present will be of great practical significance to you as individuals and to your Institute. There are two questions that anybody...
by Mortimer J. Adler, Ph.D. This quote is from a chapter on Philosophy's Past from Dr. Adler's book "The Four Dimensions of Philosophy." Hopefully it will shed light on some of the issues we have been discussed. "The second unfortunate result can, with equally good reason, be called "suicidal psychologizing." Like...
BY MORTIMER J. ADLER One can be a generally educated human being without being knowledgeable in this or that specialized field of empirical science. Such knowledge belongs to the specialist, not the generalist. But one cannot be a generally educated human being without knowing the history of science and without...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS November 3, 1787 Plea for Union Continued IT IS not a new observation that the people of any country (if, like the Americans, intelligent and well-informed) seldom adopt and steadily persevere for many years in an erroneous opinion respecting their interests. That consideration naturally tends to create...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, October 31, 1787 Plea for Union WHEN the people of America reflect that they are now called upon to decide a question, which, in its consequences, must prove one of the most important that ever engaged their attention, the propriety of their taking a very comprehensive,...
By Mortimer J. Adler and Peter Wolff In the history of human liberty, Locke's essay Concerning Civil Government stands out not only as a great contribution to political theory, but also as an effective instigator of political action. It is a stirring pronouncement of the principles of the English "bloodless...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS To the People of the State of New York—October 27, 1787 Introduction AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance;...
A libertarian defence of national sovereignty BY PHILIP VANDER ELST Three quarters of a century ago, when Britain was fighting for her life and the freedom of Europe, no important body of opinion would have questioned the value of patriotism or the importance of preserving and cherishing our nationhood as a...
Individual Liberty in the Crucible of History, Part 2 BY CLARENCE CARSON Source: The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, 01 June 1962 The ideas which would, in time, act as an acid to eat away the intellectual foundations of American liberty made their appearance and began to gain sway over thinkers in the...
BY SELWYN DUKE With Venezuela spinning out of control, it’s said that U.S. officials fear a military coup. We ought to ask “Why?” Democracy on the brain can be a dangerous condition. George W. Bush pursued his unwise “nation-building” policies under the assumption that, as he put it, “democracies don’t go...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY: MAJOR WORKS James Madison's Notes: Federal Convention of 1787 May 14, 25, 1787   Monday May 14th 1787 was the day fixed for the meeting of the deputies in Convention for revising the federal system of Government. On that day a small number only had assembled. Seven States were not...
BY SELWYN DUKE Ever since Donald Trump’s rise to 2016-contender prominence, the rap on him, and perhaps part of his broad appeal, has been that he’s not a conservative. And he’s not — he’s a nationalistic populist. Yet there’s another way to understand The Donald’s professed politics: as that...
THE AMERICAN TRADITION: CLARENCE CARSON Source: The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, Date 01 March 1964 Writers in the twentieth century have often entertained them­selves (and presumably their readers) by taking pot shots at their particular betenoire, the despised Puritan. If  Americans are not spontaneous in their sex relations as some writers would like, it is ascribed to repres­sions...
FOUNDERS CORNER LIBRARY, MAJOR WORKS Wednesday, August 13, Saturday, August 16, 1788 Brief Summary of Arguments For and Against the Proposed Constitution with a focus on whether it is best to propose Amendments Before or After Ratification. ACCORDING to the formal division of the subject of these papers, announced in my first...
THEY WERE BELIEVERS, NOAH WEBSTER 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language LAW, noun 1. A rule, particularly an established or permanent rule, prescribed by the supreme power of a state to its subjects, for regulating their actions, particularly their social actions. Laws are imperative or mandatory, commanding what shall...
THEY WERE BELIEVERS, NOAH WEBSTER 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language LAW, noun 1. A rule, particularly an established or permanent rule, prescribed by the supreme power of a state to its subjects, for regulating their actions, particularly their social actions. Laws are imperative or mandatory, commanding what shall...