Lawrence W. Reed is President of the Foundation for Economic Education and the author of the book Real Heroes: Inspiring True Stories of Courage, Character and Conviction. Used with the permission of the Foundation for Economic Education.
LAWRENCE W. REED, FOUNDATION FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION       From football stars to entertainment figures to politicians, it seems that every other day America witnesses the fall of yet another icon. Are we celebrating the wrong people? Exactly what makes a hero? Lawrence Reed, president of the Foundation for Economic Education, recently spoke to Free...
As the Great October Socialist Revolution reaches its centennial anniversary, it's important to remember the devastation it wrought. LAWRENCE W. REED, FOUNDATION FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION The propaganda of the old Soviet Union referred to it for decades as the “Great October Socialist Revolution,” the momentous event that brought Vladimir Lenin to...
BY LAWRENCE W. REED Question: If you could go back in time and spend one hour in conversation with 10 people—each one separately and privately—whom would you choose? My list isn’t exactly the same from one day to the next, but at least a couple of the same names are always...
BY LAWRENCE W. REED To write about a man known chiefly as a theologian — a bishop in the early Catholic Church, no less — might suggest at first a discourse on religious issues. Augustine of Hippo (later canonized as “St. Augustine”) was unquestionably a giant of Christian thought and...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN The good news is that more millennials are skeptical of economic intervention than trust the government to improve anything. The bad news is that a growing minority of young voters embrace the term socialism, which has an increasingly positive connotation even with those who don’t...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN The hero in this story is not any one person but rather nearly two million Americans — moms and dads who go the extra mile and who, often at great sacrifice to themselves, are rescuing children in a profoundly personal way. They are the homeschoolers,...
Rapacious royalty in the run-up to Runnymede BY LAWRENCE W. REED June 15, 2015 marks 800 years since a fateful day along the River Thames just twenty miles west of central London. It’s a good thing to note such anniversaries. They encourage us to discover things we should have learned or...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN Clichés of Progressivism, Part 16 Progressives have a problem with ownership, especially when it’s yours. The very notion seems to conjure up in their minds an anti-social acquisitiveness, selfishness, and greed. Far more quickly, they come to the defense of “sharing” because it suggests sacrificing ownership...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN April 25, 2015, marks a century since John James Cowperthwaite entered the world. It’s a birthdate that deserves celebration everywhere. I suggest April 25 as Cowperthwaite Day, to be observed on every continent by men and women who revere the blessings of a free economy and...
Warmed over regulations from 80 years ago won't fix the Web LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN Last month, the Federal Communications Commission launched a historic power grab over the Internet, euphemistically known as “net neutrality,” based on a Great Depression-era law to regulate public utilities. While entrepreneurs are pursuing cutting-edge business models and developing...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN Clichés of Progressivism, Part 13 “Gym Now Stresses Cooperation, Not Competition,” blared a headline in The New York Times a decade ago. The story was about an elementary school where “confrontational” games, team sports, and elimination rounds were changed or scrapped so that differences between students’ athletic abilities...
Clichés of Progressivism, Part 11 LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN For a society that has fed, clothed, housed, cared for, informed, entertained, and otherwise enriched more people at higher levels than any in the history of the planet, there sure is a lot of groundless guilt in America. Manifestations of that guilt...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN Clichés of Progressivism, Part 8 Thanksgiving is just one day each year.  But because we have so much to be thankful for, maybe it ought to be every day. G. K. Chesterton once said, “I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN I begin with this remark of the celebrated Roman historian Livy, written 2,000 years ago: There is an exceptionally beneficial and fruitful advantage to be derived from the study of the past. There you see, set in the clear light of historical truth, examples of every...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN Clichés of Progressivism, Part 6 On April 19, 2014, the Colonial Bread store in my town of Newnan, Georgia, closed its doors after a decade in business. The parent company explained, “In order to focus more sharply on our core competencies, the decision was made to...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN When the housing bubble burst in 2008 and brought much of the economy down with it, the more thoughtful analysts explained that government was hardly an innocent bystander. Its housing agencies, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, played the roles of Bonnie and Clyde. Congress and...
LAWRENCE W. REED, THE FREEMAN Clichés of Progressivism #3 “Free people are not equal, and equal people are not free.” I wish I could remember who first said that. It ought to rank as one of the great truths of all time, and one that is fraught with profound meaning. Equality before the...
LAWRENCE REED, THE FREEMAN Question: If you could go back in time and spend one hour in conversation with 10 people—each one separately and privately—whom would you choose? My list isn’t exactly the same from one day to the next, but at least a couple of the same names are always...