Margaret Thatcher "The Iron Lady"

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Known as “The Iron Lady” for her stand against communism, Margaret Thatcher was born OCTOBER 13, 1925.

She became the first woman Prime Minister of the United Kingdom at a time when England’s government was facing bankruptcy, employment was on the rise, and there were conflicts with labor unions.

Margaret Thatcher successfully turned the country around by cutting social welfare programs, reducing trade union power and privatizing several industries.

On February 5, 1996, while traveling through New York City, Margaret Thatcher had an interview with Joseph A. Cannon, printed in Human Events.

Offering advice to America, she explained:

“Biblical basis affects one’s whole view, attitude and outlook…

The notion of human rights comes from the sanctity on the individual…The Decalogue-Ten Commandments-are addressed to each and every person. This is the origin of our common humanity and of the sanctity of the individual.

Each one has a duty to try to carry out those commandments. You don’t get that in any other political creed…”

Margaret Thatcher continued:

“It isn’t merely about democracy and liberty…It is personal liberty with personal responsibility. Responsibility to your parents, to your children, to your God. This really binds us together in a way that nothing else does.

If you accept freedom, you’ve got to have principles about the responsibility. You can’t do this without a biblical foundation.”

Margaret Thatcher went on:

“Your Founding Fathers came over with that. They came over with the doctrines of the New Testament as well as the Old. They looked after one another, not only as a matter of necessity, but as a matter of duty to their God.

There is no other country in the world which started that way.”

Margaret Thatcher spoke further:

“Today, people are trying democracy. But they look at it as a philosophy or political pattern, without understanding its roots.

I’m afraid democracy’s fundamental religious roots are weakening. There are some countries, fortunately, kept alive by faithful people. But even they are tending to weaken.”

Regarding education, Margaret Thatcher stated:

“In the British system, children are taught Christianity. They are taught a faith in school. It is a compulsory subject.

In my day, the schools were places where children learned the great hymns which stayed them the rest of their lives. Hymns, Prayers, Bible readings. It is really all locked together.

These things pass into our bloodstreams. Even if your parents are not practicing Christians, or Jews, or what have you.

It is important that people realize that history is an enormous, great and wonderful story of the fantastic efforts of man in the face of great diversity. By looking at history this way, you see that man never lost faith, no matter how terrible things were.”

Concerned over the break up of traditional marriage, Margaret Thatcher stated:

“Today, I am particularly concerned about the number of marriages that break up. And about the numbers of children that are born to single mothers. This is the greatest threat of all. Those numbers have gone up from 1950, both in your country and in mine.

For centuries before that it stayed about the same. These things did happen to single mothers, but it was only about 5% of births.

In the post-war period, mothers were provided with houses, or flats and incomes. We hoped that would help the children.

But what we have done by this is not to relieve the problem, but to multiply it. Today, 30% of children in your country and mine are born to single mothers.

We also find that the criminality factor in much higher in children with single mothers, for the reason that they’ve never been brought up against a stable background with a supportive environment.

If there is one thing I cannot stand, it is…cruelty or abuse of children. It is the worst crime. It was in the New Testament that our Lord said, ‘Anyone who harms these little ones shall have a millstone around his neck and sunk in the deepest sea.'”

Of the character of Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher wrote:

“Winston Churchill…was a great traditionalist. I remember the last time he left the House of Commons. We were rising to go to the election, and knew he would not come back to the House. He couldn’t walk unaided.

He got up from his seat and two members supported him. He turned around and bowed for the last time to the speaker. The significance of that is that he was not only bowing to the speaker. When we bow, we are bowing because the first Parliament sat in the Palace of Westminster in a student’s chapel.

The speaker’s chair and the table in front were where the altar was. And so when it became the House of Commons, you would bow also toward the altar. And of course, we have prayers every day. So he was bowing for the last time. He was a man of great faith.”

Regarding Israel, Margaret Thatcher stated:

“We have to remember that the Jewish people never, ever lost their faith in the face of all the persecution and as a result have come to have their own promised land and to have Jerusalem as a capital city again.”


The Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.


Still time to order Bill Federer’s latest book: Prayers & Presidents – Inspiring Faith from Leaders of the Past Invite Bill Federer to speak: 1-888-USA-WORD [email protected] www.AmericanMinute.com


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