Battling for the Rule of Law in Alabama

Liberty Counsel LogoLIBERTY ALERTS, LIBERTY COUNSEL

Montgomery, AL – “Alabama probate judges have no discretion to violate the law of Alabama, the Constitution of Alabama, and the clearly expressed will of the People of Alabama,” Liberty Counsel said in a reply brief to the Alabama Supreme Court yesterday.  Since U.S. District Court Judge Callie Granade ruled against Alabama’s marriage laws last month, activist judges across Alabama who were not parties to the case nor under her jurisdiction have begun issuing same-sex marriage certificates, despite an Administrative Order from Alabama Chief Justice Moore demanding otherwise. Liberty Counsel issued a manadamus petition asking the Alabama Supreme Court to end the lawlessness.

The activist judges do not have the “discretion to follow the non-binding hypotheses of that court any more than they could follow the courts of Hawaii, Massachusetts or Timbuktu,” Liberty Counsel told the court. If activist judges “follow the recommendations of federal courts in cases to which they are not parties, they could follow those federal courts – both trial and appellate – that have upheld the constitutionality of natural, man-woman marriage, consistent with the Alabama Constitution and law, [but they] do not want to follow those decisions,” Liberty Counsel pointed out.

“We are in a Constitutional crisis in America. Government officials from probate judges to the President of the United States are ignoring the rule of law and arrogantly creating their own laws,” said Mat Staver, Founder and Chairman of Liberty Counsel. “A trial court’s decision about the constitutionality of a federal question applies only to that case; it does not overturn the Alabama Constitution,” continued Staver. “Legislators make laws, not judges, not Presidents. Americans fought the Revolutionary War to win the right of a representative form of governance, we cannot give it up now amidst this battle over same-sex marriage.”


Used with the permission of Liberty Counsel.