Which is better, much knowledge or a little experience?

THOMAS JEFFERSON LEADERSHIP

I am anxious to hear from you, lest you should have suffered in the same way now as on a former similar occasion. should any thing of that kind take place … I know nobody to whom I would so soon apply as mrs Suddarth. a little experience is worth a great deal of reading, and she has had great experience and a sound judgment to observe on it. I shall be glad to hear at the same time that the little boy is well.

Source: To Mary Jefferson Eppes , October 26, 1801

Patrick Lee’s Explanation

Leaders value experience over vast knowledge alone.
Jefferson’s younger daughter (named Mary but commonly known as Maria or Polly) had a baby in early January,1800, who lived just three days. She had numerous health complications following that pregnancy.

She gave birth to a second son, Francis Wayles Eppes, five weeks before this letter was written. Grandfather Jefferson was at Monticello for the birth but had returned to Washington. Four weeks later, he was anxious for a first-hand report.
Jefferson highly recommended a local midwife, Martha Suddarth, to assist should any post-natal problems arise:
1. While doctors were available, many had only their reading to draw upon.
2. Even “a little experience” was worth “a great deal of reading.”
3. Mrs. Suddarth not a little but “great experience.”
4. Even better, she had sound judgment to complement her experience.

Jefferson also wanted confirmation “that the little boy is well.” That boy would be Maria’s only surviving child from three births. Maria herself would die several months after the third delivery in 1804. After his grandfather’s death, Eppes moved to Florida and became a prominent citizen in the Tallahassee area. In the 1850s, he would be the prime influence in the establishment of a seminary there. That school would evolve into Florida State University.

“Our city officials were mesmerized by your performance …”
Executive Director, Missouri Municipal League
Let Mr. Jefferson work his magic on your audience!
Invite him to speak. Call 573-657-2739

 

Originally posted at http://ThomasJeffersonLeadership.com

The Moral Liberal Thomas Jefferson Editor, Patrick Lee, is a professional speaker, actor and writer. Since 1990, he has inspired, entertained and educated audiences from Maine to Hawaii with his authentic, first person leadership presentations as President Thomas Jefferson, Frontiersman Daniel Boone, and Lewis & Clark Co-Leader William Clark. He also appears as himself, The Hopeful Humorist™, with a program of motivational humor, patriotism and inspiration.

His business address is ThomasJeffersonLeadership.com.

Your comments