The Newer McCarthy Era, Spin It

BY T.F. STERN

I’ve grown to appreciate the talent some folks in the movie industry use to spin their side of a story in such a way as to make it possible for me to stand up and cheer for the wrong side, their presentation having been accomplished so well.  As proof, I own both of the movies listed on DVDs and enjoy watching them.

Two movies come to mind off hand; but you can be sure there are many others.  The first movie would be, The American President, with Michael Douglas playing the President of the United States with his girlfriend by Annette Bening.  The movie carefully presents the liberal left’s dream of removing firearms from the public along with the never-ending desire to rid our nation of fossil fuel dependency. 

Somewhere a love story advances with the idea that it’s immoral, suggested by hypocritical right wingers, for a sitting president to have a girlfriend who might not match up with poorly defined moral standards, hypocritically disdained by the presumed GOP candidate planning to run against him in the next election.  The movie hit a homerun as far as entertainment values are counted; beautifully presented, plenty of family type moments with the President’s daughter engaging within her role quite well. 

But the second movie, The Majestic, with Jim Carrey playing a fellow sought for questioning by the House Un-American Affairs Committee, is even more subtle in its message and delivery.  Jim Carrey’s character gets blindly drunk after having been Black-listed at the movie studio; accused of being linked to communism.  He then drives his fancy car off a bridge into the waters below and, as a result, develops amnesia. Hey, it’s Hollywood which makes it all believable.

Upon awakening on a beach with a huge bump on his head, he’s mistakenly identified by folks in the nearby town as a returned war hero, not just a war hero; but a posthumously awarded Medal of Honor recipient, credited with saving many lives during WWII.  The more he gets to know the people, the more he appreciates the Spirit of America which cost so many of their ‘brave boy’s’ lives. 

He falls in love with the dead hero’s girl along with the idea that patriotism is real, that the fellow everyone believes him to be personified all the good things America stands for; only to come to the realization, as his memory returns, that he is someone else, a person who lacks almost any of the character traits which everyone believes he has.

The folks from Washington figured out where he was about the same time and haul him in front of the House Un-American Affairs Committee for questioning.  As it turns out, according to his own testimony, he’d dated a girl and had attended a meeting; but only because he wanted to make it with the girl and nothing to do with her political leanings.

The movie did a great job of painting the McCarthy era hearings just as we were taught in school, over-zealous inquisitions rather than civilized representatives working for a freedom loving people.  Their goal was to look for suspected communists, discover their identities, search them out, destroy their lives and anyone associated and then display these traitors in front of the American public to justify putting the fear of communism front and center.  This is how the McCarthy era was presented in the movie. 

Our history books, mostly controlled by the liberal left, tend to validate this image; however, upon closer inspection of the facts, and over time, a goodly percentage of the individuals who McCarthy suspected of being members of the Communist Party were in fact communists or communist sympathizers; but let’s not let facts get in the way of what history books include or delete.

Basically, those who run Hollywood, write and produce far too many of the movies which fit the description of morally bereft and socially unfit; but that’s just an opinion.  Is it any wonder the communist agenda specifically included the need to get rid of the House Un-American Affairs Committee or emphasized the need for the entertainment industry to be taken over?

Back to our movie, The Majestic

During the heavy-handed questioning, our hero’s attorney attempts to invoke the 5th Amendment in order to protect his client; but Jim Carrey’s character grows a spine and instead pulls out a book containing the Bill of Rights and starts quoting the 1st Amendment, against the inquisitors demands to stop.  He awkwardly but passionately, reminds them that the person for whom he was erroneously mistaken, would have expected these men to already understand the principles for which this great nation was built upon, lecturing them for violating the contract we as Americans depend on.  The tide turns in his favor and he has won the day.

I found myself standing up and cheering for the underdog; great scene. 

However, something was wrong; not with the movie, the writers had figured out a way to spin the fact that in real everyday life most of their work is subversive and achieves the goals of the communist agenda.  (side note: look carefully at the partial comment below that last image)

Here they were using the 1st Amendment in this movie as a tool to prove they stand for American values; all the while doing their level best to degrade and destroy the moral fabric or our nation via the garbage they turn out on a daily basis. 

How’s that for subtle? The Majestic deserves an award for being able to spin Hollywood and its ilk as if they were heroes, waving American Flags and supporting American values; all the while their agenda is to lower American standards into the gutter and flush Christian values down the nearest toilet.  I’m not sure there’s an Academy Award for being able to accomplish so much male bovine excrement in one movie; but if there were…


t-f-stern-1Self-Educated American, Senior Edi­tor, T.F. Stern is both a retired City of Hous­ton police offi­cer and, most recently, a retired self-employed lock­smith (after serving that industry for 40 plus years). He is also a gifted polit­i­cal and social com­men­ta­tor. His pop­u­lar and insight­ful blog, T.F. Sterns Rant­i­ngs, has been up and at it since January of 2005.