Tags American Thought

Tag: American Thought

Samuel Adams—To Richard Henry Lee (January 15, 1781)

American Correspondence, Samuel Adams In 1781, while the war was still uncertain, Samuel Adams writes to his good friend and fellow patriot encouraging him to...

Samuel Adams—To James Warren (October 24, 1780)

Democratic Thinker, American Correspondence Despite the political shenanigans following the adoption of 1780 Massachusetts constitution, Samuel Adams advises his fellow patriot, James Warren, to not...

Bryant: Freedom to Speak

Democratic Thinker, American Debate Following the Cincinnnati Abolition Riots in 1836, William Cullen Bryant writes an editorial defending the right of all citizens to express...

Berkeley—On Education in America

Democratic Thinker, American Thought VERSES on the Prospect of Planting Arts and Learning in America. ————— THE Muse, disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious...

Seneca—On Providence

Democratic Thinker, Western Thought The Stoic philosopher, Lucius Annaeus Seneca—highly regarded by the early Christians—writes for his friend Lucilius, a discourse on adversity and its...

John Leland: The Rights of Conscience Inalienable

Democratic Thinker, Freedom of Religion Following the adoption of the U.S. Constitution, John Leland—a leader of the American Baptists—publishes one of his sermons arguing that,...

William Wirt: Address at Rutgers College—Education

Democratic Thinker, American Thought In 1830, William Wirt—late retired as U.S. Attorney General—delivers a speech before a group of students at Rutgers College. The...

William Wirt: Address at Rutgers College—Private Character

Democratic Thinker, American Thought In 1830, William Wirt—late retired as U.S. Attorney General—delivers a speech before a group of students at Rutgers College. The...

William Wirt: Address at Rutgers College: Public Character

American Thought In 1830, William Wirt—late retired as U.S. Attorney General—delivers a speech before a group of students at Rutgers College. The address, ...

William Wirt: Address at Rutgers College—Opening Remarks

Democratic Thinker, American Thought In 1830, William Wirt—late retired as U.S. Attorney General—delivers a speech before a group of students at Rutgers College. The...

Daniel Webster: Duties of American Citizens

American Thought Following the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, who had died on the same day—July 4th, 1826—, the Boston City Council...

Demophilus—Principles of the English Constitution: English Constitution

Principles of the Ancient English Constitution, Democratic Thinker Shortly after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a writer under the pseudonym of Demophilus publishes...

Demophilus: Principles of the English Constitution: Conclusion

Principles of the Ancient English Constitution, Democratic Thinker Shortly after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a writer under the pseudonym of Demophilus publishes...

Demophilus: Principles of the English Constitution: The Destruction

Principles of the Ancient English Constitution, Democratic Thinker Shortly after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a writer under the pseudonym of Demophilus publishes...

A Bold and Arduous Project: Ben Franklin

Benjamin Franklin's "Bold and Arduous Project of Arriving at Moral Perfection. He lists 13 virtues to attain one at a time. He was surprised by its difficulty.

Cotton Mather: Through Defects Come the Works of the Lord — Democratic Thinker

American Thought Cotton Mather, a month after his eighteenth birthday, asks God for help with his speech impediment the day before he preaches a...

Webster’s American Education—§ 15— Democratic Thinker

Noah Webster, shortly after the end of the Revolutionary War, publishes an essay in his American Magazine outlining his reasons and methods for revising the educational system in the new republic.

John Adams: Essay No. 2, On Self Delusion — Democratic Thinker

The most abandoned minds are ingenious—in contriving excuses for their crimes, from constraint, necessity, the strength or suddenness of temptation, or the violence of passion, which serve to soften the remordings of their own consciences, and to render them by degrees insensible equally to the charms of virtue and the turpitude of vice. - John Adams

The American Scholar: The Duty — Democratic Thinker

Ralph Waldo Emerson addresses the Phi Beta Kappa at Cambridge with an oration that would become known as The American Scholar. "He is to resist the vulgar prosperity that retrogrades ever to barbarism, by preserving and communicating heroic sentiments, noble biographies, melodious verse, and the conclusions of history."

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