Democratic Thinker

John Adams: Essay No. I, On Private Revenge — Democratic Thinker

John Adams, during the summer of 1763 (before he has taken up politics), publishes his first three essays anonymously in the Boston Gazette—the first on private revenge; the second, a two part essay concerning self-deception; and, the third, a defense of his first essay against charges of pacifism. - Today's Democratic Thinker

The American Scholar: The Duty — Democratic Thinker

Ralph Waldo Emerson addresses the Phi Beta Kappa at Cambridge with an oration that would become known as The American Scholar. "He is to resist the vulgar prosperity that retrogrades ever to barbarism, by preserving and communicating heroic sentiments, noble biographies, melodious verse, and the conclusions of history."

The American Scholar: The Education — Democratic Thinker

Ralph Waldo Emerson addresses the Phi Beta Kappa at Cambridge with an oration that would become known as The American Scholar. "Is not, indeed, every man a student, and do not all things exist for the student’s behoof? And, finally, is not the true scholar the only true master? But, as the old oracle said, “All things have two handles. Beware of the wrong one.” - Today's Democratic Thinker

Samuel Adams — Candidus, 14 October 1776 — Democratic Thinker

Prior to the Revolution, Samuel Adams sends another of his firey letters—under the psuedonym, Candidus—to the Boston Gazette, advancing his belief in Liberty. Wrote Adams: "The truth is, All might be free if they valued freedom, and defended it as they ought." - Democratic Thinker

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 6 — Democratic Thinker

Every thing in France has gone on directly contrary to all the silly expectations of the democrats, though most exactly in conformity with the laws of man’s nature, and the evidence of history. - Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 5 — Democratic Thinker

Liberty is not to be enjoyed, indeed it cannot exist, without the habits of just subordination: it consists, not so much in removing all restraint from the orderly, as in imposing it on the violent. - Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 4 — Democratic Thinker

In a series of papers published in 1801, Fisher Ames unleashes one of the Federalist’s most scathing attacks on the Anti-Federalist’s unbridled democratic principles. Ames does so by drawing their principles to their logical conclusions—illustrating his conclusions with the unprincipled actions of the European democrats and their American supporters and apologists. Said Ames: "Time is as little a friend to folly, as to hypocrisy."

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 3 — Democratic Thinker

In a series of papers published in 1801, Fisher Ames unleashes one of the Federalist’s most scathing attacks on the Anti-Federalist’s unbridled democratic principles. Ames does so by drawing their principles to their logical conclusions—illustrating his conclusions with the unprincipled actions of the European democrats and their American supporters and apologists. How is it, then, that the democrats find a right in the whole people so much more extensive, than what belongs to any one of their number?

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 2 — Democratic Thinker

As the common law secures equally all the rights of the citizens, and as the jacobin leaders loudly decry this system, it is obvious, that they extend their views still farther. Undoubtedly, they include in their plan of equality, that the citizens shall have assigned to them new rights, and different from what they now enjoy. - Fisher Ames

John Adams on Canon and Feudal Law — Democratic Thinker

I say rights, for such they have, undoubtedly, antecedent to all earthly government,—Rights, that cannot be repealed or restrained by human laws—Rights, derived from the great Legislator of the universe. Since the promulgation of Christianity, the two greatest systems of tyranny that have sprung from this original, are the canon and the feudal law. - John Adams, 1765