Samuel Adams: E.A. (February 27, 1769) — Democratic Thinker

Prior to the Revolution, Samuel Adams sends one of his firey letters—under the psuedonym, E. A.—to the Boston Gazette, advancing his belief in Liberty: Also, that the doctrines of passive obedience and non-resistance are outdated, and useful only by those promoting the divine hereditary right of kings. - Today's Democratic Thinker

John Adams: Essay No. III, On Private Revenge — Democratic Thinker

John Adams, during the summer of 1763 (before he has taken up politics), publishes his first three essays anonymously in the Boston Gazette—the first on private revenge; the second, a two part essay concerning self-deception; and, the third, a defense of his first essay against charges of pacifism. - Democratic Thinker

John Adams: Essay No. 2, On Self Delusion — Democratic Thinker

The most abandoned minds are ingenious—in contriving excuses for their crimes, from constraint, necessity, the strength or suddenness of temptation, or the violence of passion, which serve to soften the remordings of their own consciences, and to render them by degrees insensible equally to the charms of virtue and the turpitude of vice. - John Adams

John Paul Jones Raids the English Coast.

During April, 1778, John Paul Jones of the American warship, Ranger, raided the English coast—burned the docks at Whitehaven—captured the Drake—escaped the Britsh fleet—all before sailing to France. The raid forced the British to deploy warships along their coast, keeping them away from America, and encouraged the French to provide monetary support for the American Navy. - Democratic Thinker

John Adams: Essay No. I, On Private Revenge — Democratic Thinker

John Adams, during the summer of 1763 (before he has taken up politics), publishes his first three essays anonymously in the Boston Gazette—the first on private revenge; the second, a two part essay concerning self-deception; and, the third, a defense of his first essay against charges of pacifism. - Today's Democratic Thinker

The American Scholar: The Duty — Democratic Thinker

Ralph Waldo Emerson addresses the Phi Beta Kappa at Cambridge with an oration that would become known as The American Scholar. "He is to resist the vulgar prosperity that retrogrades ever to barbarism, by preserving and communicating heroic sentiments, noble biographies, melodious verse, and the conclusions of history."

The American Scholar: The Education — Democratic Thinker

Ralph Waldo Emerson addresses the Phi Beta Kappa at Cambridge with an oration that would become known as The American Scholar. "Is not, indeed, every man a student, and do not all things exist for the student’s behoof? And, finally, is not the true scholar the only true master? But, as the old oracle said, “All things have two handles. Beware of the wrong one.” - Today's Democratic Thinker

Samuel Adams — Candidus, 14 October 1776 — Democratic Thinker

Prior to the Revolution, Samuel Adams sends another of his firey letters—under the psuedonym, Candidus—to the Boston Gazette, advancing his belief in Liberty. Wrote Adams: "The truth is, All might be free if they valued freedom, and defended it as they ought." - Democratic Thinker

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 6 — Democratic Thinker

Every thing in France has gone on directly contrary to all the silly expectations of the democrats, though most exactly in conformity with the laws of man’s nature, and the evidence of history. - Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 5 — Democratic Thinker

Liberty is not to be enjoyed, indeed it cannot exist, without the habits of just subordination: it consists, not so much in removing all restraint from the orderly, as in imposing it on the violent. - Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 4 — Democratic Thinker

In a series of papers published in 1801, Fisher Ames unleashes one of the Federalist’s most scathing attacks on the Anti-Federalist’s unbridled democratic principles. Ames does so by drawing their principles to their logical conclusions—illustrating his conclusions with the unprincipled actions of the European democrats and their American supporters and apologists. Said Ames: "Time is as little a friend to folly, as to hypocrisy."

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 3 — Democratic Thinker

In a series of papers published in 1801, Fisher Ames unleashes one of the Federalist’s most scathing attacks on the Anti-Federalist’s unbridled democratic principles. Ames does so by drawing their principles to their logical conclusions—illustrating his conclusions with the unprincipled actions of the European democrats and their American supporters and apologists. How is it, then, that the democrats find a right in the whole people so much more extensive, than what belongs to any one of their number?

Fisher Ames: Equality Number 2 — Democratic Thinker

As the common law secures equally all the rights of the citizens, and as the jacobin leaders loudly decry this system, it is obvious, that they extend their views still farther. Undoubtedly, they include in their plan of equality, that the citizens shall have assigned to them new rights, and different from what they now enjoy. - Fisher Ames

They are Jealous of Their Liberties

The Stamp Act did not pass without a struggle. During these discussions, Colonel Barre, who, in the war against the French, was the friend and companion of Wolfe, charged the members of the House of Commons with being ignorant of the true state of the colonies. Read his response. - Americanist History, William Jackman

In Dispute: Taxation Without Representation

“If a British Parliament,” said they, “in which we are unrepresented, and over which we have no control, can take from us any part of our property, by direct taxation, they may take as much as they please, and we have no security for any thing, that remains, but a forbearance on their part, less likely to be exercised in our favour, as they lighten themselves of the burthens of government, in the same proportion, that they impose them on us.” - Ramsay, History of the American Revolution

John Adams on Canon and Feudal Law — Democratic Thinker

I say rights, for such they have, undoubtedly, antecedent to all earthly government,—Rights, that cannot be repealed or restrained by human laws—Rights, derived from the great Legislator of the universe. Since the promulgation of Christianity, the two greatest systems of tyranny that have sprung from this original, are the canon and the feudal law. - John Adams, 1765

Braddock’s Defeat, Washington’s Miraculous Preservation

William J. Jackman recounts young George Washington's miraculous preservation in the French and Indian War battle known as "Braddock's Defeat."

Braddock's Defeat, Washington's Miraculous Preservation

William J. Jackman recounts young George Washington's miraculous preservation in the French and Indian War battle known as "Braddock's Defeat."

William Penn: Friend of God, Indians, and Liberty

The virtues of William Penn saved the colony, so dear to his heart, from becoming a province ruled by royal governors and impoverished by tax-gatherers....Though in his old age so poor, on account of the sacrifices he had made, as to be compelled to go for a season to a debtor's prison, he refused to sell his estates in America unless he could secure for the people the full enjoyment of their liberties. His death was as peaceful as his life had been benevolent. - Jackman

New Amsterdam Becomes New York — William J. Jackman

The spirit of democracy began to pervade the minds of the Dutch; the credit of this has been given to the New Englanders, who were continually enlightening them on the subject of the freedom of Englishmen. This annoyed Stuyvesant beyond endurance. - William J. Jackman

Puritan Prosperity: By-Product of Reverence, Integrity, Honor, and Hard Work

Their descendants sometimes smile at what they term the crude notions of these Puritan fathers; but do these sons and daughters reflect how they themselves acquired their consciousness of their own superiority over their ancestors who lived more than two hundred years ago? Their own attainments unquestionably have been the result of that severe training continued from generation to generation; each succeeding one modified and refined by the experience, the education, and correct moral influence of the one preceding ... William J. Jackman on Puritan Contribution

Moral Corruption Fatal in the End — Milton Lomask

Americanist History, 1787, Milton Lomask YZEKCKUYUKU7 "Virtue," a group of New Hampshire ministers pointed out, was helpful "to any kind of government, but it was...

John Elliot: Apostle to the Indians

The Puritans had long desired to carry the gospel to the Indians. John Eliot, the devout and benevolent pastor of the church in Roxbury, in addition to his pastoral labors, gave them regular instruction in Christianity. He learned their language that he might preach to them; he translated the Bible, and taught them to read in their own tongue its precious truths. This translation, which cost him years of labor, is now valued only as a literary curiosity; it is a sealed book, no living man can read it. - Americanist History, William J. Jackman

New England Education: Early Christian Beginnings

The next year a printing-press, the gift of some friends in Holland, was established Its first work was to print a metrical version of the Psalms, which continued for a long time to be used in the worship of the churches in New England. The following preamble explains the next law on the subject of education:—"It being a chief project of that old deluder Satan to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures," it was determined that every child, rich and poor alike, should have the privilege of learning to read its own language. - Americanist History Daily, Jackman

First Written Consitution: The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut

The constitution was framed on liberal principles. They agreed to "maintain the purity of the gospel," and in civil affairs to be governed by the laws under their constitution. No jurisdiction was admitted to belong to the King of England. Every one who took the oath of allegiance to the commonwealth was entitled to vote. - Jackman on Hooker's Constitution

John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton, and the Founding of New Haven, Connecticut

A day of fasting and prayer for direction was observed, and then they formed a government, pledging themselves "to be governed in all things by the rules which the Scriptures held forth to them.

“One Small Candle Will Light a Thousand” — The Pilgrims & Religious Freedom

They were the pioneers of religious freedom—the openers of an asylum in the New World, to which the persecuted for religion's sake, and political opinions, have been flocking from that day to this. - Jackman in reference to The Pilgrims.

"One Small Candle Will Light a Thousand" — The Pilgrims & Religious Freedom

They were the pioneers of religious freedom—the openers of an asylum in the New World, to which the persecuted for religion's sake, and political opinions, have been flocking from that day to this. - Jackman in reference to The Pilgrims.

They Thanked God With All Their Hearts — William P. Jackman

God had blessed their labors, and this was to be a feast of Thanks-Giving. "So they met together and thanked God with all their hearts, for the good world and the good things in it." - Jackman

Pilgrim Faith and Determination, William Jackman

So dear to them were these privileges, that all the privations they had suffered, the sickness and death which had been in their midst, the gloomy prospect for them, could not induce them to swerve from their determination to found a State, where these blessing should be the birthright of their children. - Jackman re: The Pilgrims