Americanist Classroom

New Amsterdam Becomes New York — William J. Jackman

The spirit of democracy began to pervade the minds of the Dutch; the credit of this has been given to the New Englanders, who were continually enlightening them on the subject of the freedom of Englishmen. This annoyed Stuyvesant beyond endurance. - William J. Jackman

Puritan Prosperity: By-Product of Reverence, Integrity, Honor, and Hard Work

Their descendants sometimes smile at what they term the crude notions of these Puritan fathers; but do these sons and daughters reflect how they themselves acquired their consciousness of their own superiority over their ancestors who lived more than two hundred years ago? Their own attainments unquestionably have been the result of that severe training continued from generation to generation; each succeeding one modified and refined by the experience, the education, and correct moral influence of the one preceding ... William J. Jackman on Puritan Contribution

Moral Corruption Fatal in the End — Milton Lomask

Americanist History, 1787, Milton Lomask YZEKCKUYUKU7 "Virtue," a group of New Hampshire ministers pointed out, was helpful "to any kind of government, but it was...

John Elliot: Apostle to the Indians

The Puritans had long desired to carry the gospel to the Indians. John Eliot, the devout and benevolent pastor of the church in Roxbury, in addition to his pastoral labors, gave them regular instruction in Christianity. He learned their language that he might preach to them; he translated the Bible, and taught them to read in their own tongue its precious truths. This translation, which cost him years of labor, is now valued only as a literary curiosity; it is a sealed book, no living man can read it. - Americanist History, William J. Jackman

New England Education: Early Christian Beginnings

The next year a printing-press, the gift of some friends in Holland, was established Its first work was to print a metrical version of the Psalms, which continued for a long time to be used in the worship of the churches in New England. The following preamble explains the next law on the subject of education:—"It being a chief project of that old deluder Satan to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures," it was determined that every child, rich and poor alike, should have the privilege of learning to read its own language. - Americanist History Daily, Jackman

First Written Consitution: The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut

The constitution was framed on liberal principles. They agreed to "maintain the purity of the gospel," and in civil affairs to be governed by the laws under their constitution. No jurisdiction was admitted to belong to the King of England. Every one who took the oath of allegiance to the commonwealth was entitled to vote. - Jackman on Hooker's Constitution

John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton, and the Founding of New Haven, Connecticut

A day of fasting and prayer for direction was observed, and then they formed a government, pledging themselves "to be governed in all things by the rules which the Scriptures held forth to them.

“One Small Candle Will Light a Thousand” — The Pilgrims & Religious Freedom

They were the pioneers of religious freedom—the openers of an asylum in the New World, to which the persecuted for religion's sake, and political opinions, have been flocking from that day to this. - Jackman in reference to The Pilgrims.

"One Small Candle Will Light a Thousand" — The Pilgrims & Religious Freedom

They were the pioneers of religious freedom—the openers of an asylum in the New World, to which the persecuted for religion's sake, and political opinions, have been flocking from that day to this. - Jackman in reference to The Pilgrims.

They Thanked God With All Their Hearts — William P. Jackman

God had blessed their labors, and this was to be a feast of Thanks-Giving. "So they met together and thanked God with all their hearts, for the good world and the good things in it." - Jackman

Pilgrim Faith and Determination, William Jackman

So dear to them were these privileges, that all the privations they had suffered, the sickness and death which had been in their midst, the gloomy prospect for them, could not induce them to swerve from their determination to found a State, where these blessing should be the birthright of their children. - Jackman re: The Pilgrims